What’s happening now?

For those of you new to the blog my name is Penny Peterson. I started this blog and I am a nurse at Children’s in Mpls.  This is a free blog and not subsidized by anyone. 

This is a discussion for what is happening and any progress or lack of going on in our organizations

I want to share this article about skills a manager should possess. 

Critical thinking of nurse managers

Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.
I am only one; but still I am one. I cannot do everything; but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do–Helen Keller

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131 responses to this post.

  1. Moving forward over these next couple years until the next contract negotiation I think the hospitals have a lot of work to do if they do not want a repeat of this past summer. A key to avoiding another strike in 2013 will be nursing leadership and listening to the nurses and working with managment.
    I have been hearing so much over the last couple days that perhaps we do need a strong nurses union to protect us. I do feel that this decision could prove disastrous as it moves nursing farther away from management.

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    • Posted by nursewhocares on September 28, 2011 at 1:33 am

      Here is a link to a recent one-day walk out in San Francisco where a patient passed away from a medical mistake resulting during this strike. Of course, the union now blames the hospitals for this mistake.
      I have read the responses to the article and nurses are not finding support. I feel the union has moved our profession to at one time where we were resected to distain by the public. How sad this has happened.

      http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article/comments/view?f=/c/a/2011/09/26/MNV91L9KL5.DTL&plckItemsPerPage=20&plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:f42ee404-3981-4a9e-9c2b-a538e164a525

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      • Posted by nursewhocares on September 28, 2011 at 2:21 am

        At Kaiser Permanente, 17,000 nurses were expected to walk-off the job to show solidarity with the National Union of Healthcare Workers. The union is in contract talks with Kaiser and facing demands for cuts in health and retirement benefits, Idelson said.

        Thursday’s action was among the largest nurses’ strikes in recent years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In two strikes in March and May, up to 2,500 health care workers, including 2,100 nurses, held one-day walkouts at Kaiser Permanente’s flagship Los Angeles Medical Center as part of a contract dispute.

        The last largest nurses’ strike, according to the BLS, was in June 2010, when a dispute over nurse-patient ratios led to a one-day walkout of 12,000 nurses working at 14 Minneapolis-area hospitals.

        http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/09/22/ap/business/main20109925.shtml

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        • Posted by nursewhocares on September 28, 2011 at 2:38 am

          There is no way of telling if this nurse indeed showed up after the day strike to work and was locked out.

          http://abcnews.go.com/Health/california-hospital-patient-dies-nurses-strike/story?id=14609140

          And not everyone walked out.

          http://marinscope.com/articles/2011/09/22/all/breaking/doc4e7b8d6c4182b967798130.txt

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          • Posted by nursewhocares on September 28, 2011 at 3:17 am

            he recent strike conducted by the nurses from the California Nurses Association
            I wonder if anyone could comment on this statement. So the nurses had a signed three year contract and still proceeded to engage in a one day strike?

            This has been deemed as a very irresponsible step on their part. They went on alone day strike which was in opposition of Kaiser.

            “We think the lockout is punitive, it’s unnecessary”, revealed a spokesperson from the CAN, Charles Idelson.

            Irrespective of the fact that a contract had been signed between the two that there shall be no sort of lockouts or protests by the staff during this period of three years, they went on strike. Nurses are the support system for any medical facility and it was very irresponsible of the staff to be influenced by the union and land up in strike.

            This has had serious effects on the patients as they have had to suffer due to lack of care. Nurses have a very pivotal role to play in hospitals and they should keep in mind the interests of patients before they take steps for personal gains and interests. This is what their profession teaches them during pledge. All these things were ignored by the nurses of the Californian nurses when they went to become a part of the strike.

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            • Posted by nursewhocares on September 28, 2011 at 3:27 am

              If I am understanding this right, it is a different one day strike than Minnesota in the sense the MNA nurses were without a contract. If this is the case, could nurses find themselves in trouble walking out during a signed contract.

              http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/750154

            • Posted by nursewhocares on September 28, 2011 at 3:42 am

              This to me would be a new tactic with NNU having sympathy strikes by union hospitals that are under contract. With 2013 contracts coming up, I wonder if NNU would look for other areas like Duluth to hold a sympathy strike with nurses in the Minneapolis area or for that matter hospitals like HCMC or St. Francis who have different contracts periods. This could bring more force to hospital negotiations with all area hospitals potential striking whether or not they are under contract.

              While Nelson said the hospital recognizes NUHW’s legal right to conduct a strike, he said that “a CNA-sanctioned work stoppage is inconsistent with the CNA contract that just went into effect on Sept. 1. In fact, Kaiser Permanente and CNA negotiated this contract earlier this year with the mutual goal of labor peace. The contract specifically states, under the header, ‘No Strikes or Lockouts’ that ‘There shall be no strikes, lockouts or other stoppages or interruptions of work during the life of this Agreement.’ ”

              CNA, however, denied that the Kaiser contract restricts their right to engage in a sympathy strike. “Kaiser has always recognized our rights and the rights of other employees to engage in sympathy strikes with other unions,” Idelson told BNA Sept. 12. By stating otherwise, he said, Kaiser is “making unilateral changes in their interpretation of this contract.”

              http://hrm-partners.com/hr-news/23000-california-nurses-to-stage-one-day-strike

  2. Posted by Integrity Nurse on January 23, 2011 at 9:18 pm

    Yes, it is extremely puzzling to me as to why Cindy will no longer be the manager of the float team. She started on the 8th floor as asst. clinical nurse manager, where she did a bang-up job for several years, then took over the float team and basically turned it into an effective, well-oiled machine for the hospital. She has a masters in organizational leadership, and is well liked by all because of her ethics and integrity and her ability to work well with everyone. I am trying to say that she did her job very well – no question about that. It is a fact. I have to ask myself why they would create a situation in which it would be impossible for her to stay. The higher ups at Children’s clearly do not have their fingers on the pulse of what is really going on in the hospital. I heard her position was posted while she was on vacation. Then she had to bid on it. She was clearly the most qualified candidate in the bidding, but that didn’t seem to matter. So again the hospital demonstrates that money is the bottom line. Magnet status means nothing when leadership opts to get rid of a qualified, successful individiual and put another less qualified one in their place. This would not have happened if Ginger Malone was still in charge of nursing. So, Mr. Brumbaugh, and Mr. Goldblom, were you sold a bill of goods on this one? Or do you even care? Or did you even know? I think this is characteristic of big corporation. Budget over ethics at any cost. I am saddened and disappointed in Childrens. I was willing to cross the picket line last summer in the face of much criticism by my coworkers. Because I believed I had an obligation to my employer and to my patients. But when that same employer shows no sense of loyalty to some of its best and brightest employees, it makes me wonder, why even bother? Anyone is expendible, no matter how well they do their job. Perhaps there was some jealousy or feelings of inferiority among other nurse leaders. It really makes one wonder. I guess we may never know.

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  3. Posted by childrens nurse on January 24, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    In all my years at Children’s I have to say I have never been more disappointed. Losing Cindy Walsh is going to prove to be a big mistake going into tougher times and a promised nastier 2013 by MNA. Having a good manager is vital…and you let go of one of the best I have ever worked under. I have heard that nurses who were involved in the interview process had recommended that Cindy be hired for the job….so is management not listening? Is this how you are showing the nurses that you are willing to work with us?

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  4. Posted by Float team nurse on January 24, 2011 at 2:27 pm

    I am in Shock of the news that Children’s is letting Cindy go. I can not believe that they would let one of nursing leaders finest go that easily. I have worked with many other nurse managers in my career and she is by far the best I have had. She is well qualified for this position and there is no reason she should not have gotten it. I am disappointed in the hospital leadership.

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  5. Posted by upset at Children's on January 24, 2011 at 3:01 pm

    Unbelieveable!! I still cannot believe that management would let one of the finest and most enthusiastic leaders in nursing go. I stood up for management this summer…but not again. Management made a huge mistake going forward and if they want to save themself they need to admit they made a mistake and fix this mess….or it will have terrible effects on them in the long term. How did this happen? Who let this happen? Seriously HR needs to look into how this was allowed to happen. Now is the time for stellar nursing leadership…and you just lost one of the finest leaders. Does it bother someone that Cindy is so well respected? Is there a jealousy problem??

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  6. Posted by dragonfly on January 24, 2011 at 10:32 pm

    As an outsider(not employed by Children’s) looking at this, I too have to wonder what happened here. Obviously,Children’s HR/Administration does not value their nurse’s input. It looks to me as though someone may have been feeling threatened by a leader so well liked and respected by her staff/coworkers. I am sad about the staff’s loss of a valuable manager. Administration—wake up!

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  7. Posted by Integrity nurse on January 24, 2011 at 10:40 pm

    Children’s admin is taking a long winter’s nap.

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  8. Posted by disappointed on January 25, 2011 at 8:45 am

    This is a huge setback in moving forward. How can admin totally disregard the nurses voice? They made a big mistake and are not being accountable for their actions. I know many of us have voiced our disappointment and I have not heard anything from admin. This decision does not sit well with nursing and has put doubt in the minds of many of us on their committment to work with us. We have made it clear that Cindy Walsh was the person for the job…and getting rid of one of the best nursing leaders Children’s has ever had is a huge mistake. It did not matter which side of the fence we were on this summer…Cindy was a support for everyone. Children’s….good luck in 2013…you are supposed to work with us not against us.

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  9. Posted by still waiting on January 25, 2011 at 11:03 am

    I still have not seen any response from admin on this situation. You can advertise our service standards to the public but are you living them? Did this decision come from one person? Certainly you know that nursing does not support this decision…..so when you are looking for our support and cooperation you will need to look elsewhere. Really….whose decision was this?? Perhaps you need to look into that one…you are allowing some of the leadership at Children’s to throw the organization under the bus. And why did you do the employee survey before this happened? Why don’t you try that one again….I think you will get a very different response this time. Children’s….do you care what impact this is having on our organization? Losing Cindy is a huge loss…and you are turning a blind eye to it.

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  10. Posted by RN at Children's on January 25, 2011 at 1:03 pm

    Whatever organization that wants to build a solid relationship with their nurses will be lucky to have Cindy Walsh. This will be Children’s loss. Cindy provides fantastic leadership and vision for the nurses she leads. This is a time to listen to your nurses and build bridges from management to nurses….Children’s just tore down the bridge and made the river wider. It is sad that they keep managers that are on probation and get rid of one of the best. Do you just keep managers that can be your puppet? This is so sad for an organization I had hoped would rise above what happened this summer and work together to show the public what a great organization we are…we failed.

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  11. Posted by shocked on January 25, 2011 at 2:36 pm

    My title says it all. So I got a call from a friend that the annoucement has been made…the one who got the job was a staff nurse and recently manager of a small epilepsy unit. He has not even graduated with his master’s. Cindy has been an assistant nurse manager of a hem/onc unit and the last few years of the float team. Is there some discrimination going on here? Is he better qualified in the eyes of Children’s management because he is a man? Clearly the nursing staff involved in this process did not feel he was more qualified than Cindy. I feel sorry for him…he may be a nice guy but he is stepping into some shoes he will never fill. By the way…who is this Katie and what did she have to do with all of this??

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  12. Posted by Maria on January 25, 2011 at 6:27 pm

    This development is so disconcerting and unfortunate….a tremendous loss for Children’s.

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  13. Posted by anotherview on January 26, 2011 at 7:56 am

    I can see why everyone might have questions and concerns about a situation and a person they are tremendously supportive of. I only caution that there is always more to a story or event that the “public” can never know and with matters of employment confidentiality is key. Administration and HR cannot tell their “side” as it would violate all sorts of employment confidentiality. Even the person in question is always cautioned to keep things confidential. And, sometimes if they do choose to speak out, they will always paint it in a favorable light for themselves. That’s human nature. Understand I am not agreeing or disagreeing with this decision but simply pointing out that all facts may not be able to present themselves and making a judgement with only part of the information is unfair – especially when confidentiality needs to be respected.

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    • Posted by Float nurse on January 26, 2011 at 4:11 pm

      Cindy has been with Children’s since, I believe, 1995. She has been valued and respected for many years. Her leaving has shocked many. And to replace her with a man who has not been a nurse very long and is not even done with his master’s…compared to someone who has many years experience in nursing and leadership and has her master’s in unexplainable. The issue that there are things that cannot be said I imagine will be an excuse for management to brush this off and go on. Well this is a fine way to work with nursing. Remember, nursing was involved in the interview process and they recommended Cindy be hired…I don’t think management could possibly give a good excuse for this one. Things will be interesting the next couple years!!

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      • Posted by Integrity nurse on January 26, 2011 at 8:51 pm

        Thank-you Float Nurse. I completely agree with you. I am struggling with this whole thing. I know all about HR matters and confidentiality, and all of that. But the fact remains, Cindy was clearly the best candidate, nurses recommended she be hired, and besides all of that, she never should have been made to bid on her own job in the first place. She is so qualified. I think her superiors had problems with her. Problems like: she is more qualified than they are. Jealousy, or whatever you want to call it. After this decision, I actually don’t know how they sleep at night. Frankly, I wouldn’t want a decision like this on my conscience. You don’t just play with people’s lives, and expect it to not come back to bite you in the butt. The ripple effects of this extremely poor decision will bear itself out in due time.

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  14. Posted by Nurses Who Care on January 27, 2011 at 6:20 pm

    When you find a nurse manager who is respected by her staff, it is sad to see administration discard this talent. With my many years of experience as nurse, I found these nurses managers are gems and not to be let go since they provide a positive culture on the nursing unit which results in a better outcome with patient care.

    Many of the older nurses remember when Twin Cities nurse managers were once part of MNA and back in the eighties (prior to the strike) these nurse managers went to court and lost when hospitals defined their job description as “management” which led to them no longer being able to participate in MNA membership. Some nurse managers chose to leave their positions due to this decision.

    I feel administration of many local hospitals recognized how this blog influenced negotiations this past summer and I believe a strike would have taken place without the voices of these nurses on this blog. With 2013 just a short time away, it is difficult to understand how an administration would lay off a nurse manager who staff cared for and respected. I imagine MNA will not be unhappy to see how this blog has reacted to this decision with leadership change since this nurse manager was not afforded protections MNA members enjoy with a change in a job status as with a lay off.

    Bottom line, administration express their wish for open communication with the Twin Cities nurses and this decision may lead to far reaching consequences they may not realize.

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  15. Posted by Maria on January 27, 2011 at 8:16 pm

    I believe one thing we all need to keep in mind, is that we are employees of a very large organization. Poor management decisions are made every day, in the corporate world, the service industry or sales environment. I don’t think the union piece has anything to do with our disappointment in Children’s right now. One or two individuals in management made a seriously poor decision, and while I do believe that does reflect poorly on Children’s, it is so far an isolated event. Additionally, one thing that really bothered me about the unions antics and attitude this past summer, is I felt that they had generally lost touch with the fact that we are Employees of the hospitals and do not own them. And while our input and opinions should be highly regarded and listened too, nurses do not run the hospitals. I certainly do not want to see us adopting a similar attitude. I am as disappointed about these developments as all, but I do think we need to keep things in perspective and remember to stay on point. The direction this union, under NNU, is taking the nursing profession will prove disastrous for our profession, and as things stand now I cannot support it under any circumstances.

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    • Posted by Community Nurse on January 30, 2011 at 11:07 am

      Maria,

      These organization decisions do have other implications which contributes or diminishes patient care. Also, I think some may rethink the union’s ability to protect nurses from being in this position as this nurse manager found herself in with being let go.

      I firmly believe this decision to remove a well respected nurse manager who is performing well can lead to a disruption in the unit which could result in a decrease in the level of care for the patient. It maybe small things for example, a float nurse willingness to come in for an extra shift when the census is higher and there is no staff available. Or caring less with the forward position regarding how the organization works with MNA in future contracts negotiations.

      While I understand the hospital is the employer, it should be equally important we can perform our job under favorable conditions and this include qualified nurse managers. The union’s position with patient ratios didn’t resonate with many; however, having lack of leadership with managers/nursing directors or organization decisions which are poorly made might change the tide with how nurses see MNA.

      On a different note, I remember a favorite nursing instructor during my nursing education said “A nurse manager can make or break your career.” For this nurse manager, her superior has changed her career and for what reason seems questionable. My hope is there will be a silver lining in her future.

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      • Posted by Maria on January 30, 2011 at 2:23 pm

        Community nurse, you make some excellent points, and I agree with each and every one of them. Cindy Walsh is a true team player and the decision to let her go was absolutely wrong. Also, the ripple effect of this decision will absolutely disrupt relationships and our ability to provide the best quality of patient care that we are capable. I also hope that with healthy feedback to upper management a terrible event like this will never happen at Children’s again. In fact, in light of your comments, I would like to retract my earlier point, with the exception of this. I honestly do believe that the unions unwillingness to collaborate and work together with management will not further our shared goals. And while I certainly understand the anger around this disruption, I hope we don’t give up the fight.

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  16. The words of Florence Nightingale:
    And remember every nurse should be one who is to be depended upon, in other words, capable of being a “confidential” nurse. She does not know how soon she may find herself placed in such a situation; she must be no gossip, no vain talker; she should never answer questions about her sick except to those who have a right to ask them; she must, I need not say, be strictly sober and honest; but more than this, she must be a religious and devoted woman; she must have a respect for her own calling, because God’s precious gift of life is often literally placed in her hands; she must be a sound, and close, and quick observer; and she must be a woman of delicate and decent feeling.

    Cindy, Florence would be proud of you. Thank you for all you have taught us.

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  17. Posted by Mpls nurse on February 9, 2011 at 9:01 am

    I continue to be disappointed. The decision by administration to let Cindy Walsh go did not make sense but now we have heard the new manager for the float team is being mentored in the master’s program he is in by the director whose decision it was to let Cindy go. It is disappointing that Children’s allows one person to make decisions that have such a profound effect on their organization. The fact that Cindy’s job was posted when she was not even in the country made most of us fear she would not be staying at Children’s. It appears the decision was made by someone before the interview process even began.
    Now there is more restructuring going on and units closing. While some of this cannot be avoided, it could be handled better.This is an area in which good leadership would be helpful but that is not valued at Children’s.
    I agree with many that the decision to let Cindy go will not be forgotten and will have a lasting effect on Children’s. Letting another manager go a month after she is diagnosed with breast cancer is also sad. I will keep both in my prayers.

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  18. So now Children’s is facing lay-offs once again. I think we need to assess if not accepting any concessions this past summer really won us anything. It is OK for the nurses who have alot of seniority buy how about those who do not and also for the ancillary staff we lost and will lose in the future? The hospital asked that we consider everyone taking 6 LOA’s a year…which would help even out our staffing and perhaps allow us to have more staff when we are busy and not be paying out so much when we are not. We can all sit back and complain that we are short staffed now, but are we taking any responsibility to help correct the problem?

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  19. Posted by butterfly on February 16, 2011 at 8:28 am

    I agree with you Penny, I think we all need to share the burden to help mitigate the job losses of those nurses with less seniority, and of which the hospitals have invested alot of resources orientating them. That all of us, even the nurses with higher senioity who are presently immune from LOA’s agree to take our share of those LOA’s. The proposal of 6 LOA’s may not have even been necessay if all staff share equally in the mandatory 3 LOA process and this possibly could help avert job losses. My concern is that our union and unions in general will never agree to any concessions in order to help any business/hospital stay sound fiscally on any issue that is presented to them during this unprecented financial crisis our country is facing.

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    • Butterfly…here is the link to the video on youtube about nurses in CA that would not abandon their patients. They suffered threats from the SEIU. This is happening and should not be tolerated!!

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      • Posted by Maria on February 16, 2011 at 7:17 pm

        This case, dating back to 2008, is a clear example of the sentiment we have all expressed through this blog. That being, nurses should not be subjected to the gut wrenching decision of either abandoning their patients, on the one hand, or being vilified by their peers on the other. Add to that the illegal threats and actions by a nurses union that is supposedly in place to protect its members.

        There are no happy endings to this situation, however, the NLRB ruled in favor of these nurses and determined that the SEIU nurses union did in fact violate the law in this case. Not surprisingly, the union is appealing the decision, but I think it’s a day brightener that these nurses in CA stood up and made a difference. Not unlike what we did here in MN. No matter what state we practice in or what hospital we work for…nurses should never be expected to abandon patients.

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  20. Posted by A Nurse on February 18, 2011 at 11:43 am

    I have been fortunate to work within both the leadership and bedside nursing world for many years. This benefit has givin me persepective into the decisions that come from leadership. I have seen many wonderful people let go, or move on from current positions. I do not know this nurse manager, and she is lucky to have been so cherished, but believe me when I tell you that there most certainly is another side. Letting someone go who has great experience is never taken taken lightly even by the seemingly most calous of leaders. This move can be financially detrimental, cause nursing upset, disruption in workflow, with no quarantees that the next hire will even do as well. I wish that leadership could explain thier decisions in more detail so that nurses understand, but unfortunately no explaination is better in this case. They have reason why they did not hire her, and to discuss those reasons would not be beneficial for the person that now has to look for further employment. Focus on your patients and on being active in your unit to increase positive patient outcomes. Be sad for your loss, but help the new hire to be successful, because really the focus is the patient. The union leaders are fighting hard and winning by always taking the focus off the patient, or putting a spin on what we need to care appropriately for our patients and that spin is not only not what we need as nurses, but increasing aggrivation between leaders and nurses which results in communication breakdown, which literature is clear…is detrimental to patient outcomes. Remember that leaders are responsible for you! And they are ultimately responsible for everything that happens to the patient as far as dissatisfaction or poor outcomes. So while nurses are out there complaining about petty aspects of thier jobs, the leaders are taking the heat for thier med errors, poor decisions due to lack of knowledge( god forbid a nurse take it upon themself to learn without being paid or within their FTE)while the nurse goes home to thier lives. My goal is to get nurses to focus on the patient, give excellent care, and take pride in the career that they chose, for the sake of the patient.

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    • A Nurse, although many of us are feeling a lack of good leadership at Children’s right now, I agree that aggrivation is not good and the President of MNA has promised aggrivation until they get what they want. However, the decisions and lack of leadership we are experiencing does affect patient outcomes and adminstration continuing to make poor decisions does not sit well with many. The things you said about administration being responsible are correct….so perhaps they should look at the decisions they are making more closely. That being said, I still will never support this union as long as they remain radical and focused on striking. I became a nurse to care for my patients and I think I should be able to have the expectation that the organization and the union will support me in that endeavor.

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    • Posted by Safety Nurse on February 27, 2011 at 6:45 am

      I to have worked on both sides of the hospital environment – Staff and Administration. Strong leadership is essential to great patient outcomes and successful organizations. We need strong leaders among the nursing staff and strong leaders in the C Suite who collaborate closely with each other to achieve great patient outcomes and financial success. Unfortunately leadership must occasionally make unpopular decisions based upon what is best for the entire organizaion. Communication and open honest relationships between leaders and staff are essential to making sound leadership decisions that support safe care and ethical treatment of employees. The continual aggravation promoted by your union leadership does not promote an effective working relationship in any organization. Continual aggravation really only serves to meet the needs of your union leadership none of which serves our patients better. The labor members of the union do not hold the interests of patients close – they are more interested in growing their membership to gain power and money. A union should truly value the needs of patients and the staff who care for them above all else. I do not see them rallying for patients = I see them rallying to preserve the union structure.

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      • Posted by dragonfly on February 28, 2011 at 1:02 pm

        The union does not promote aggravation but agitation! They are ravel rousers trying to keep ALL on edge. You are right about them growing membership to gain money which results in power. Look at their behavior in Wisc.–it is despicable and one of their big leaders had the guts to say it was “for the kids”. Have we heard that line before? It is “for the patients”. Come on! Wake up! The unions (not the members as individuals) are self serving. I heard Trumpka (pres. of the AFL/CIO–and please research this man’s history. He is representing us too) on a Sunday news program and the first union name out of his mouth was “nurses”–not teachers, not firefighters, not police etc. but NURSES! Why? “Because we are the most trusted profession” and we will be losing that label if we continue down this radical path the NNU is taking us on. Watch out–it is going to be a wild ride! I will NEVER support nurses striking. Everyone loses in a strike-everyone…

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        • What has changed in nursing that some feel it is ok to abandon the patients and say it is for their own good? And why do some people find it so hard to believe that some nurses do not believe we should strike? Union rhetoric right now talks about us losing our democracy…we lost it when we joined NNU…of which MNA did not promote democracy because we did not get to vote on that one. We need to work together and this continued agitation will make things worse for all. I will not put the patients in the middle.

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  21. I posted this above but wanted to post again here:

    Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.
    I am only one; but still I am one. I cannot do everything; but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do–Helen Keller

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    • Posted by dragonfly on February 28, 2011 at 1:06 pm

      As you know I second this!Helen Keller was a wise woman. We need to continue to fight the good fight for our patients and their safety that is jeopardized by us walking out on them in such a vulnerable state.

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  22. Posted by butterfly on February 27, 2011 at 5:54 pm

    I wholeheartedly agree with the comment above by Safety Nurse, many of us have resigned from this union because of these very same reasons.

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  23. Posted by dragonfly on March 2, 2011 at 9:48 pm

    Did anyone see Dayton speak to the MNA nurses at the Capitol yesterday during their “day on the hill”? I am sure most of you are aware the government has named a select group of employees–“essential employees” (i.e.police, fire, postal workers, etc). This means they are not allowed to strike. In his speech, he made the statement and I quote “Doctors are important. Nurses are ESSENTIAL”. I agree with him 100% and therefore, should not be permitted to strike. He and I finally agree upon something!

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    • I am glad we can find some common ground with Gov Dayton..perhaps he will help pass a bill that actually states that we are essential!

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      • Posted by dragonfly on March 3, 2011 at 6:17 pm

        I would second that motion! He is saying what we all have felt all along—nurses should not be allowed to strike.

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  24. I have to comment on a recent news report that stated that Children’s is unsafe. I think this is a good example of why the hospital needs some flexibility with staffing. When we have the same amount of staff year round and our census fluctuates what are we to do with the extra staff we have during the quieter times? Did the report talk about all the extra nurses the hospital pays during the summer months because they cannot make anyone .75 or above stay home? I have been at work when there are 1-2 nurses circulating on each floor while a couple more circulate around the hospital..costing the hospital alot of money. If the union is truely concerned for patient safety and adequate staffing perhaps they should consider the proposed 6 LOA’s that hospitals had asked us to take this summer, which could save jobs and provide for more staffing when we are busy and allow for a decrease when we are not as busy. I think the union should take some responsibility in this situation. Are we unsafe? We are busy this time of year and while staffing has been tight and many have worked double shifts, it will slow down so we will again have extra nurses on each shift that the hospital has to ask to stay home or pay them to come to work when we don’t need them.

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  25. Posted by Safety Nurse on March 9, 2011 at 6:46 am

    Penny Your comments are right on related to the unrealistic demands of todays union members. Nurses know the realities of fluctuating hospital census that drives the need to have the ability of flexing the staffing to meet those needs. They cry out for safer staffing yet when the census is high many do not want to work extra hours and when the census is low they want to be guarenteed they will not have to take time off. Hospitals can no longer afford to have staff “working” when there is no work. Hospitals in our community survive because non RN staff have accepted mandatory hours reduction – when did RNs forget they are members of the Team and all team members should support the each other. Now I see union members (nursing and others) asking for protection from layoff. Who among us can be guarenteed work and pay when there is no money. Hospitals will have to decrease costs by 15-20% over the next few years in order to survive under the payment schemes suggested by Healthcare reform. How will that happen if unions continue to demand more for less.

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  26. “In any moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing,the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing”
    Theodore Roosevelt

    Reply

  27. I saw on the news this morning that the bill in Wisc would make teachers essential employees..meaning they cannot strike. Does it make sense to people that teachers are essential but not nurses…unless you work in a county hospital!! The government needs to step in and make this a law for all nurses!!

    Reply

  28. Jobs are being rebid this week at Children’s….followed by bumping next week…and then lay offs. I still believe the mandatory LOA’s could save jobs but the union will not take any responsibility for this one. The union is too busy fighting in Wisc and Indiana and wherever else the national agenda of the NNU takes them. A 2011 organizational priority of the MNA is “Play an integral role in building the National Nurses United” (Minnesota Nursing Accent, p. 3).

    Minnesota Nurses Association. (March/April, 2011). Minnesota Nursing Accent, 83(2).

    Reply

    • Posted by Dragonfly on April 1, 2011 at 11:20 pm

      What is happening at Children’s is a sad state of affairs. Where is the MNA in helping to work with Children’s nurses and administration on a strategy to prevent layoffs? Oh–that’s right–MNA doesn’t “work and play well with others” in my opinion and “seniority rules” so that is the way the ball bounces for the nurses low on the totem pole. And Penny you are right, it appears MNA is too busy on the national agenda to attend to business of their members at home.

      Reply

  29. Posted by Safety Nurse on April 2, 2011 at 9:03 am

    It is a sad state of affairs – Nurses have forgotten about their commitment to patients, community and each other in favor of big labor union business. What happened to the professionalism of the nurses in this country. I am disappointed in the members of my profession.

    Reply

  30. A recent IOM report on the future of nursing discusses removing barriers to nurses practice. The interstate compact that would remove the need for nurses who have a license in a NLC state to obtain a license when they work in another NLC state is one way to help accomplish this goal. However, MNA is fighting this bill which will be voted on in the Senate. MNA has stated that a reason they oppose the bill is that they would have no way to track the nurses who come and work during a strike. Why do they need to know this information and what do they do with that information? MNA has claimed safety is an issue but “Once the compact is enacted, each compact state designates a Nurse Licensure Compact Administrator to facilitate the exchange of information between the states relating to compact nurse licensure and regulation.”

    Reply

    • Posted by Dragonfly on April 23, 2011 at 8:27 am

      Exactly! WHY does the MNA need this info? They are a union–not a state agency. WHO really needs to track this info? Do they want to be able to track this for retaliation purposes against those who come from another state to work during a strike to keep our patients safe and cared for as the “nurses who care for you” are out on a picket line leaving our patients unsafe???? What is this REALLY about? There are good nurses all over the US not just in MN. Who will be thie “administrator”? She/he better not be a part of the MNA contingency but a neutral objective party.

      Reply

  31. The nurses will strike in Hibbing…it will be May 4th…the 10 day notice has been given. I pray the patients are safe and that nurses think about the oath to care for their patients that they took when they became a nurse. Think about something…were things really this bad before the NNU came to our state? The NNU has promoted bad relations between nurses and management.

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  32. Posted by Safety Nurse on April 23, 2011 at 7:12 pm

    How can nurses who really care about their profession and the patients they care for walk out in a strike action leaving patients from the community in the care of strangers. The nurses who come in (at great cost to the hospital) are no doubt good nurses but they are none the less strangers to the hospital and the community. Patients need to feel that they are safe – how can they when they do not know who will take care of them. Wake up nurses – stop supporting the NNU/MNA and their national agenda. Partner with your administration to do the right thing for your patients.

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  33. Next week nurses in Hibbing will be walking out on their patients. Please pray for the patients who will be the one’s who suffer and are being used to further the union’s cause.

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  34. Yeah!! An agreement has been reached that the nurses get to vote on in Hibbing so hoping for NO STRIKE!!

    http://www.fox21online.com/news/hibbing-nurses-strike-cancelled

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  35. Posted by dragonfly on May 19, 2011 at 7:14 am

    Is it true that Safe Staffing Reports are being completed and sent to the MNA abut not given to the supervisors? If so, how can the problem be acted on if the administration does not have the details? FYI–if your “dirty laundry” is aired to the public, they will go elsewhere to seek “safe care”. With the competativeness amongst hospitals, is this a wise idea? The nurses may be shooting themselves in the foot on this one! Nurses you should be working with your administration is try to fix this not against them–they are not your enemy as the MNA/NNU wants you to believe. And by the way, who signs your paycheck? You need to wake up and start building trust and making bridges with adminstration not creating agitation and distrust but wait–that is what unions do! AGITATE!

    Reply

    • That is what I have heard too dragonfly. Working on staffing takes work and flexibility. I am hopeful that the restructuring will give the hospital the flexibility they asked for with the contract last summer so we will have enough staff when we are busy but not be paying out so much when we are not. If the hospital continues to lose money none of us will have a job. The union in this case is not the solution but part of the problem. That said…the hospital also has to communicate what their long term plans and needs are in regards to staffing.

      Reply

  36. Posted by Safety Nurse on May 19, 2011 at 9:18 pm

    Nurses Please work with your adminstrative team to resolve the issues that you say exist. If I were one of your patients reading all of the information that you post on your facebook page I would run to hospitals elsewhere to avoid the so called unsafe care you say is occurring. How can your leaders fix issues if you do not share your Safe Staffing Reports with them. How can the public trust you or your hospitals. You will not be employed if patients choose to go elsewhere for care. Partner with your leaders in the hospital – stop acting as pawns in the MNA/NNU national agenda.

    Reply

    • Posted by dragonfly on May 19, 2011 at 9:45 pm

      Right on safety Nurse! Why can’t they see what a blunder it would be to splash this into the media?? I feel sorry that they are such lemmings that cannot see what is really going on here. Nurses take the lead–do not be followers. You are professionals–start acting like one!

      Reply

  37. An interesting article about unions and their political power…or that which is now lacking.

    http://www.nationaljournal.com/columns/against-the-grain/laboring-under-a-new-world-20110517#comment-206291878

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  38. Nurses in Hibbing did not vote for the contract so may head for another strike.

    http://www.fox21online.com/news/hibbing-nurses-reject-offer-authorize-strike

    Nurses in Ely also rejected a contract and authorized teh union to call for a strike.

    http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/200062/group/homepage/

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  39. Posted by Safety Nurse on May 26, 2011 at 8:32 pm

    Nurses – It saddens me that you are moving in this direction along with so many others who do not have the courage to stand up as professionals and partner with their hospitals to make improvements. Threatening to strike seems to be the rule with MNA and CNA facilities these days. I know you say this about patient safety and patient care concerns but what does your concern about PTO and Cheaper health insurance for nurses have to do with patient safety. You say you want to attract talented nurses to your facility – why would a talented nurse want to work where there is a threat of strike. You clearly don’t understand the cost of a strike to a facility in both reputation and dollars. A strike may be the perfect and permanent way to close small facilities that struggle financially. You may be the answer to the government mission to reduce costs by reducing the number of hospitals in this country.

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  40. Posted by butterfly on May 27, 2011 at 8:00 am

    I am truly angry right now with MNA’s “Concern for Safe Staffing Forms” campaign they are waging against the hospitals. Just today on the MNA facebook page MNA stated and I quote, “Nurses keep filling out the new CFFS form ONLINE – we are going to be using this data and your first hand accounts of unsafe staffing in a very large and public way in the coming months. We need your help to tell the truth about unsafe staffing to the public” First of all these online forms only go directly to the MNA business agent and the MNA chair at the respective hospitals, it does not go to to any of the hospital leadership personnel unless the persoon filling out this online form, (after hitting the submit button) takes the time to hit the print button and actually makes a hard copy and gives it to their nurse manager or supervisor on the unit they work. In addition MNA does not make this a condition when filling out these forms, they only say they encourage you to give this form to them. Who does MNA think they are to solely receive this information, if they truly were concerned about certain shifts that a nurse may have felt was not staffed safely, the hospital needs this information more than the MNA so they can determine what the circumstances were in regards to this shift, for example: was there several ill call for this shift. was there other units that were overstaffed and quite possibly someone from another unit could have helped in this situation instead of giving Manditory LOA’s, aren’t we all highly educated enough to at least be a resource to another unit if needed to help provide support, even if it means sitting in a room who may just need watching so that the other nurse can provide care? There are a myriad of solutions that could be utilized if we just used common sense. MNA’s approach to using this information in a large and public way, without collaboration with the hospitals first does absolutely nothing to solve these issues except cause continued agitation. Legitimate concerns need to be addressed at the time, not lumped all together months down the road.

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  41. Posted by dragonfly on May 27, 2011 at 8:42 am

    As I stated in a previous entry, airing your “dirtly laundry” only serves to shoot yourselves in the foot. These issues need to be solved internally by the staff working shoulder to shoulder with their administration. How can a problem be resolved if it is not shared amongst ALL involved? This is all very childish from my perspective.

    Reply

  42. I just have to say that in these hard economic times is our union freezing their wages? Are they decreasing our union dues and not spending millions of dollars on hotel expenses each year? It irritates me when they continually say how much profit the hospitals make while they are spending our union dues and living the good life!!

    Reply

  43. Posted by Kelly on June 6, 2011 at 9:32 am

    I will say I am a non-union nurse at one of the hospitals that went through all the fun last summer. It is interesting reading about the unsafe staffing forms. I work on the education side of things and it is occuring on my end as well. MNA is getting involved in every angle stopping everything we can even though it could be in our patients best interest to have the thing we are trying to educate nurses about. And when was it a bad thing to educate nurses? That is how they make us feel like we are the dirty people trying to slide “bad” education in. I am a nurse. I am trying to educate nurses so they can care for the patients. Yet we hit a road block: MNA everytime. So sad that it has come to this when we are only trying to give the nurse what they need to care for patients. The nurses have no idea what goes on behind that big red curtain. 2013 is going to be a repeat if the nurses don’t stand with the nurses on this site and tell MNA you need to stand for us not yourselves and NNU.

    Reply

    • Posted by dragonfly on June 10, 2011 at 11:28 pm

      The MNA serves as a roadblock to many things that could help nurses–like education. Kelly is right when she says “the nurses have no idea what goes on behind that big red curtain”. Nurses need to pull back that curtain and they will have an eye opening experience. Quit being lemmings and start being leaders of our profession or be led down the path to a repeat performance of 2010! Is that what we really want? Another strike holding our patients hostage? That is who really pays the price more than anyone involved…and it is shameful!

      Reply

  44. Posted by butterfly on June 12, 2011 at 7:21 pm

    Definition of Courage: have the courage of one’s conviction, to act in accordance with one’s beleifs, especially in spite of criticism. A year has passed since the 14 Twin Cities walk-out on the vulnerable patients in these facilities and MNA has the gall to thank those nurses for their courage who chose not to show up for their shifts to take care of those patiients in need of care, In all reality by the definition of courage who do you think truly showed the courage of their convicitons, the nurses who crossed the picket line to care for those in need even though they knew the ramifications they would face from their peers,, or the nurses standing on the picket line holding up signs outside the 14 hospitals acting as though it was one big celebaration, and neglectiing their professional nursing duty to provide care to patients in their most vlunerable state?

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  45. Posted by Safety Nurse on June 13, 2011 at 8:37 pm

    Thank you to those of you in Minnesota who had the courage to stand up for our patients by going to work when your peers thought it appropriate to walk out on strike. I have followed all of the propaganda that is being posted on the MNA websites – I see a trend – No matter what do not accept what is being offered to you. I wish I believed that you were all interested in improving patient safety but everything seems to about what you have to give up. It is tiring to read.

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  46. I wish that nurses who continue to be pushed by this radical union would take a step back and see what they are doing to our profession. The unsafe staffing forms have no merit in my book if they are not shared with the hospital. How can we work with the hospital if they do not have access/knowledge of these unsafe situations? Also, now that we have shifts that are over staffed do we have over staffing forms to fill out? I do not hear MNA discussing how over staffed some of our units/shifts are…this is why we need to figure out a way to balance staffing…perhaps LOA’s…..really, would each one of us taking 3 shifts a year be too much?

    Also, supporting this union blindly, without knowing what they stand for, is like supporting a political agenda just because you consider yourself republican or democrat. Do your homework and see what you are really supporting.

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  47. Hibbing nurses once again voted to strike….or at least MNA said they voted to strike. This is not a surprise….our national affiliation with NNU has instigated strikes all over the country. They will be on strike July 11-14th. Have the nurses even read what the hospitals are proposing? We found out last summer that MNA put thier own spin on the proposals…READ THEM!!! And if they say “takebacks” you can bet the hospital did not write that on their proposals…read the documents from the source. Put your patient’s first!!

    http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/04/15/hibbingstrike/

    Reply

  48. Posted by LakesRN on July 5, 2011 at 1:28 pm

    Why didn’t MNA announce the Hibbing vote totals? This sounds like another one of NNU’s crooked fixed “elections”.

    Reply

    • Why bother counting? I think we should take a bus to Hibbing to support the patients and care for them! I am sorry for the nurses who are feeling like we were last summer….and I am sure there are some in Hibbing. My prayers are with the patients and the nurses who are struggling with a difficult decision next week.

      Reply

  49. Posted by butterfly on July 11, 2011 at 7:43 am

    I am writing this post with only the facts and without my interpretation so that whoever reads this can come to his or her own conclusions. I have been a RN at Mpls Childrens for 25 years and have been truly dismayed at the negative change in the culture during this past year at this wonderful institution that has provided care to so many children and their families. Childrens has conducted employee engagement surveys over the past five years and as result of those surveys several areas of concern were identified: respect, recognition, clarity around career development path, feeling part of decisions made and executive engagement and vision. In an effort to address these areas of concern Childrens decided to form employee focus groups that would help all of us better understand root causes of these core issues.So I was very excited and interested to be part of this focus group whose goals were to collaboratively build recommendations for solutions that will drive positve change across the entire Childrens organizaton. It was with utter disbelief that I was informed and I quote.”Unfortunately at yesterday’s MNA/Childrens Labor Management Committee, MNA leaders told us of their decison to not participate in either a focus group for MNA Leaders or to have any staff RN’s participate in the Working Sessions. We have been informed to not have any MNA members particpate in this process.” Simply because of MNA’s decision to not allow any RN’s to participate I will not be allowed to be a part of this focus group to try to work as an entire team to begin the process of developing solutions for positive change and dialogue at Childrens. I will simply let you decide what the motive of MNA’s decison is.

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    • Posted by Anonymous on July 11, 2011 at 8:59 am

      I say WOW! This is devisive behavior by MNA–divide and conquer has to be their motto. MNA does not want to work together with administration to solve problems now as what will they strike about in 2013 if we fix things now. Solving problems and building bridges does not serve a union well. They NEED to feel needed and if things are symbiotic it threatens their very existance. AGITATE AND DIVIDE–union motto. What Butterfly has told us about above demonstrates what is going on within the all wonderful MNA/NNU. They have and agenda and problem solving obviously is not part of it. RNs “who breathe union” are blind—so they have no vision of where nursing needs to go to help our PROFESSION. Keyword–PROFESSIONALS. Let’s start acting like one!

      Reply

      • MNA/NNU continues to reinforce my decision to not support them. I have a hard time seeing how any nurse can think this behavior is OK. We want a say in how things are done…but yet when the hospital attempts to give us an opportunity MNA/NNU does not “allow” the nurses to participate in a group that would provide us with that opportunity.

        Reply

        • Posted by Safety Nurse on July 11, 2011 at 9:40 pm

          It is a shame that the nurses at Children’s will not be participating in the opportunity to collaborate with the administrative team to improve working conditions and care at the hospital. This level of participation is clearly threatening to the MNA leadership who are afraid of hospital administration and nurses working together to achieve great things for patients and the staff of the facility. This level of collaboration would get in the way of the MNA/NNU national agenda which has nothing to do with patient care and safety.

          Reply

          • Posted by Anonymous on July 11, 2011 at 11:29 pm

            Safety Nurse you are right. MNA/NNU is no longer about patient care and safety or for that matter working conditons for nurses. It is all about their political agenda being in lock step with “big labor” which has nothing to do with PROFESSIONALS. I recieved an email from MNA encouraging us to attend a political meeting about the MN shutdown but they do not want nurses to meet with their own administration to prevent a future nurse’s “shutdown” in 2013!

            Reply

  50. In checking with legal counsel if the union can “forbid” nurses from participating in these focus groups if we are no longer a member of the bargaining unit….they cannot. However, it puts the hospital into an awkward position with the union so they will usually be forced to abide by the wishes of the union. Again, I have to ask why this union does not want us to make things better for employees and ultimately the patients? I continue to question MNA’s quest for patient safety.

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  51. I just read that a sticking point in Hibbing is switching from vacation and sick time to paid time off. So what happened to striking for patient safety? For those who do not abuse sick time the switch is good…..as then you have more vacation time. The amount of days they have off are not changing. Do the nurses really think this is worth striking for? I think this is more about power for the union.

    Reply

    • Posted by Dragonfly on July 13, 2011 at 4:54 pm

      I LOVE PTO!!! It greatly decreases the amount of “sick” calls. We switched a few years ago and I would never go back to SICK/VAC. Almost all of cooperate America is on PTO–get with the times. It is better for everyone except those who abuse sick time. And when that happens we know who pays the price….

      Reply

    • Posted by Safety Nurse on July 14, 2011 at 5:49 am

      I am so disappointed in the nurses at Hibbing. They promote their strike as being about patient safety when it is really about their own benefits. PTO plans are the standard in hospitals across the country with the old Vacation/Sick concept being phased out. We just went to PTO in our facility and I love it. It is only disliked by those who used to call in sick all of the time. For those of us who did not use sick time, we now have additional hours to be used for vacation or holiday. Hibbing nurses – how do your patients feel today about having strangers care for them while you parade yourself and your children around in front of your facility? Your hospital is now forced to spend additional dollars that could have been used to care for your patients.

      Reply

  52. Posted by Dragonfly on July 30, 2011 at 9:50 pm

    Where is the Hibbing strike at? Anyone know? Now Bemidji is out–and what is that one REALLY about? Just never know what to believe anymore! What a shame…the poor patients and their families…it is a scary thing for them.

    Reply

  53. Posted by Safety Nurse on August 9, 2011 at 5:43 pm

    Can anyone tell me why anybody would want to be a patient in a Minnesota hospital staffed by MNA nurses today. The continual barrage of “patient safety” concerns is without a doubt frightening to the lay community. It is amazing to me that nursing staff would allow this to continue – anyone of the descriptions of unsafe staffing taken at face value would be frightening if I did not believe that the whole story is not being shared. What a black eye to the excellent nurses who give great care in the hopes of furthering the political agenda of MNA and NNU. I am so sad about the nonprofessional behaviors exhibited by nursing staff who participate in this campaign. Real professionals would be working to find solutions – not destroying America’s faith in our profession and healthcare. It is shameful.

    Reply

  54. Posted by Maria on August 9, 2011 at 9:36 pm

    Safety Nurse, I couldn’t agree with you more. As the saying goes, it is like cutting off your nose to spite your face. Unfortunately, all of us who chose the nursing field are reaping the consequences of MNA/NNU’s absurd agenda and our fellow colleagues truly deplorable behavior. A sad time for our profession.

    Reply

  55. Posted by butterfly on August 10, 2011 at 8:42 pm

    I hope whoever is engaging in this type of behavior, especially if these reports are only going to MNA without being shared with the hospitals so they can be evaluated and validated should be found in violation of the HIPPA act and should be fired!

    Reply

    • Posted by Dragonfly on August 11, 2011 at 11:21 pm

      It is all disgusting. The national unions are just trying to get a better foothold in the “private sector” as they continue to lose ground in the public sector. Their house of cards is falling in. Look at what is happening across the nation. Nurses are one of their new pawns in funding their political agenda and lining the pockets of the union fat cats at the top. Someone has to pay for their big salaries and pensions. Why is it no one ever brings up their salaries etc??? I do not understand why nurses continue to give themselves a black eye with all the bad press on patient safety. Professional nurses need to work on this concern WITH their administration not against them. Union tactics are designed to be DIVISIVE Read Saul Alinsky 1010. We need to view our employer as an ally not enemy on the safety issue. Who writes your paycheck? Not MNA/NNU and don’t forget it!

      Reply

  56. Posted by Safety Nurse on August 13, 2011 at 9:20 am

    MNA has posted an odd message for the Bemidji nurses. MNA indicates that the managment team at Sanford Health was “plotting a strike” back in April at another facility because they heard management discussing plans for a work stoppage if an agreement could not be met through the negotiation process. Since the track record for MNA/NNU is to strike rather negotiate to an agreement management would not be meeting their obligation to protect patients and the other people who work in these facilities if they did not have a plan for continuing to provide service and care in a safe manner when the nursing professionals abandon their patients and walk out. When nurses make the decision to walk out management still has an obligation to provide safe care and continue to support all of its staff which requires a plan.

    THe other key message in the recent posting seems to be that if Bemidji nurses agree to the current proposals this will divide the MNA by creating a different contracts in different facilities. It does not seem to matter whether the contract is good for the nurses just whether it is good for the sake of union unity and power. I hope that nurses recognize that they are now being used to further the MNA’s agenda which has nothing to do with what is good for patients – just power and money!!

    SAD – SAD – SAD

    Reply

  57. Here is an interesting op ed from the Washington Examiner about the amount of time from the time the union files a petition and when the election is held.

    http://washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/op-eds/2011/08/new-nrlb-workplace-election-rules-are-more-bad-news-workers

    Reply

  58. It is disturbing to see the amount of time (and money) MNA is spending on political activity and protesting to advance unions. I would like to see MN become a right to work state so that I do not have to support a union and activity that I do not agree with. Paying dues, even when we have resigned, in my opinion continues to be forced unionism. Of course the possibility of becoming a right to work state when MNA pays so much money to politics is unlikely. I feel this union is bringing our profession down. Nurses used to be the most respected profession….I wonder if that survey is repeated after the summer of 2010 and the continuing activity if the result would be the same.

    Reply

    • Posted by Anonymous on October 12, 2011 at 11:58 pm

      Penny–you have taken the words right out of my mouth as you well know. I yen to become a right to work state so I do not have to support their activites. It drives me craaazzzy! I am sure more of the MNA dues than what is stated goes to support THEIR political agenda which is not at all what I believe in. )):
      PS Can’t wait til 2013….

      Reply

  59. Read this article if you want to see another example of union greed. Union officials receiving as much as $500,000 in pensions!!

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44872639/ns/us_news-life/

    Reply

  60. Staff is frustrated with the lack of nurses. I do not think some realize the influence the union has on the staffing shortage. Postings have to go through the nurses on lay-off status and then internally, then if not taken become external postings. I am told there have been 80 postings since May and only 20 have made it to external postings…the rest resulted in internal shifts in staff…which do not bring us more nurses. The union also has to approve giving bonuses to nurses to pick up extra shifts. I thought this union is about patient safety? They have not proven that one to me.

    Reply

  61. Posted by anotherview on November 16, 2011 at 8:01 am

    What are the feelings on uniforms? Allina is going to a standardized color for uniforms. MNA is turning it into a huge issue but generally it seems nurses are OK with it. Maybe not thrilled but I think feeling that there are bigger issues to deal with than what color they are wearing. I do not understand why MNA chooses to make a huge issue out of everything. I do feel that the union should negotiate starter sets or maybe having the employer pay for uniforms but to argue that the employer doesn’t have the right to set a standard. Maybe I just don’t care what I wear.

    Reply

  62. Posted by Safety Nurse on November 16, 2011 at 7:14 pm

    I believe that standardized uniforms is a very appropriate move. When I look at the attire of the nursing staff today, I am appalled. If nursing wishes to be viewed as a group of professionals then lets dress and act like professionals. I do not for one second believe that my 77 year old mother finds Sponge Bob and camouflage print professional or attractive. Standardized colors that we discuss with patients helps the patient distinguish between the nurse and other providers in our organization easily. Staff look much more professional. I fully believe the MNA just looks for “causes” to continue to widen the divide between management and nurses. How else can the MNA maintain control.

    Reply

  63. At Children’s the nurses all wear royal blue pants….but we are allowed to wear different colored tops/jackets. Considering we are a children’s hospital I think sponge Bob is appropriate….and liked by many, but I agree your 77 year old mother probably does not appreciate as my patients do! Departments all have their own color….but we look at the pants, not the top to distinguish.

    Reply

    • Posted by Anonymous on November 19, 2011 at 12:45 am

      On the Allina web site, it says Children’s has standardized their uniforms (top and bottoms). I could deal with just pants. We are going full circle except the color is not white! For many of my nursing years,we cold only wear solid white. It was a thrill to go to colors!I find it difficult to believe this is a source of patient satisfaction numbers rising.When my patients tell me how they like a scrub top I am wearing now and I tell them we will soon ALL be wearing the same color(and probably navy blue),they ask why as they enjoy the colorful tops we are allowed to wear. That is my question—why? Because a few have spoiled it for all by wearing street clothes to work-not scrubs! I have to admit I can’t believe what some nurses are wearing to work! Not uniforms! I truly believe that is the source of the problem and it is unprofessional. Also, our employer has every right to set the dress code to represent them in a positive light and does not need the nurses or the MNA’s approval. That is life! They sign our paycheck….

      Reply

  64. We may all finally get a chance to vote! Our union did not give us the opportunity to vote to leave the ANA so now perhaps the state will give us the chance to vote to become a right-to-work state! I do not appreciate the forced dues I have to pay to a union I do not agree with or support. Even though I am not a member of the bargaining unit I pay reduced dues…a savings of about $9/month.

    http://freedomclub.net/mn-right-to-work-memo.pdf

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  65. As the union continues to portray our hospitals as unsafe places that are terribly understaffed, can I please ask why we are not seeing stories about when we have too much staff? Nurses need to take some responsibility for the budget problems we are experiencing. I see many times units that have too much staff and the nurses are not held accountable for that but yet they hold the hospital responsible when there is not enough.

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  66. So with NNU making a public stand against Magnet status we knew MNA would be following. MNA has posted signs up in break rooms attempting to give a good explanation why we should not support Magnet Status. The explanation is that it does not promote union strength. Perhaps Magnet supports working together for the good of our patients and promoting nursing excellence? Isn’t that what nursing is about? Again, I say this is what we get when we allow labor activists to take over our profession. I would be more impressed if the MNA president received nurse of the year instead of labor leader of the year.

    Reply

  67. Posted by Safety Nurse on December 15, 2011 at 8:55 pm

    Penny – Nursing is about excellence and teamwork while we provide the very best care possible. Unfortunately the MNA pretends to represent nurses and professionalism when they really represent labor. Such a shame for our profession. When are these nurses going to recognize that they are impairing the trust that the public has in nursing in the name of activism and big labor.

    Reply

  68. Here is an interesting article about how nurses in the Texas Nurses Assoc felt about the possibility of the ANA joining the AFL-Cio. The President of the TNA stated that “striking and the perception that striking nurses are abandoning patient care also make unions unpopular.” Texas physicians can now collectively bargain under new state laws. The Texas Medical Association is not happy about the decision and stated, “We are not laborers, we are not strikers, we are not simply providers,” the TMA said. “We are caregivers who have sworn a duty to society.” I wish nurses would educate themselves on the direction this union is taking our profession.

    http://www.nurseweek.com/features/99-8/tex-ana.html

    Reply

  69. Senator Dave Thompson from Lakeville is proposing a constitutional amendment for right to work in MN! Here’s hoping this will go on the ballot in Nov and forced unionism will no longer be an issue. If this union conducted themselves professionally and had nurses and patients as their agenda, then perhaps they would not have to worry about this amendment.

    Reply

  70. Posted by Safety Nurse on February 5, 2012 at 10:33 am

    Here’s wishing the whole state of Minnesota good luck on this issue. Union membership needs to be a personal choice not a mandate from organizers.

    Reply

  71. Here is an article and intersting discussion about the Right to Work Bill that is in the legialature right now. Politics is getting in the way of allowing us to vote on this…or should I say money is getting in the way. Praying this is on the ballot in November!

    http://www.startribune.com/politics/statelocal/140446503.html

    Reply

  72. The Right to Work bill is being heard in a Senate Judiciary Committee Monday, 3/12/12 in MN. Please pray that we can get this on the ballot in November!

    Reply

    • The Right to Work passed in the Senate Judiciary committee today and will be on to the Senate Rules committee. Continue to pray this does not get stalled and ultimately gets to the Senate floor and on to the ballot. A similar bill is in the House and will go thru committees before reaching the full House.

      Reply

      • Money can buy you many things….especially politicians! The Right to Work Bill is still waiting a hearing in the Senate Rules Committee before it can get to the Senate floor..and all this just to allow the voters the privilege to vote on this themselves in November. Many decisions are being made by where the money is coming from in their political campaign. Thank you Dave Thompson for standing up for workers! This bill is still waiting to be heard in the House.

        Reply

  73. Does anyone find it humorous that MNA is promoting the Right to Work bill as a “freedom” to collective bargaining as we are forced to pay dues to a union that we do not support? I guess freedom only applies to the union and not to the individual.

    Reply

    • Those who are fighting the Right to Work bill and say there is a law that says we do not have to join a union are correct. Although, they do not add the part that although we do not have to join, we still have to pay dues! I pay $51 a month….a $9 a month savings to not belong to a union I cannot support. How is that freedom?

      Reply

  74. Posted by Penny on June 24, 2012 at 9:09 pm

    Another blow to the union….steelworkers in northern MN did not vote the union in!
    Perhaps this is how they will be held accountable!

    http://www.wdio.com/article/stories/S2667177.shtml?cat=10335

    Reply

  75. Rebidding for jobs will be happening once again at Children’s and I have heard the new positions will be 12 hours every other weekend. This is not making for happy nurses going into a contract year!

    Reply

  76. I have seen ratios that are being proposed at Children’s and heard some nurses are not happy about them…..this strikes me as funny as these look remarkably similar to the ratios MNA has brought to the legislature and the ratios they were on strike for in 2010.

    Reply

  77. Posted by Cindy on January 24, 2014 at 11:09 am

    Hello-
    Does not look like anyone has been on here lately. I thought I would try anyway. Just heard there is a “Informational picket” for MNA where I work. Not sure what is going on. Has anyone heard anything about what that is about.
    thank you-
    Cindy

    Reply

    • Sorry Cindy,
      I use my ipad and just figured out how to see new posts. I have not heard anything about any picketing. All has been quiet at Children’s.

      Reply

  78. Posted by rudy H on February 15, 2016 at 1:41 pm

    I am worried about a strike in 2016. The discussions with Allina are not starting well.

    Reply

    • Hi Rudy,
      I just saw a recent update and
      I fear you are correct. I imagine MNA will want us all to strike in sympathy which is their usual behavior. Will keep saying a prayer this settles before summer.

      Reply

  79. Posted by Rudy H on June 8, 2016 at 9:07 pm

    Oh No – worst fears realized. An 8 day strike. What a mess.

    Reply

  80. Posted by Rudy H on June 16, 2016 at 6:57 pm

    The nurses seem convinced that Allina is lying about everyone having the Allina First Plan. That there is a nefarious plot to ensure that directors and above have better insurance. I have the Allina first plan and use is moderately. Yes, I have a deductible and out of pocket but I plan, I save money tax deferred in an FSA and never have I paid more than $800 in a year. Considering their plan is about 1500.00 more they would still be saving 700 dollars. Now folks have to be without pay for a week. Let’s hope everyone regains their sanity after a week but I worry that MNA has painted themselves into a corner.

    Reply

  81. Posted by jojo12 on June 29, 2016 at 7:37 am

    And now Allina has explained the plans given situations and modified their offer I just looked at the MNA site and MNA is basically saying lets reject this the offer didn’t change. That is not true. Allina accepted all that MNA wanted for Violence Prevention, gave more time to move to the health plans etc.. So sick of this, they are not telling the truth about these plans and they are actually better for the nurses.

    Reply

    • I do wish the nurses would read the real offer and think for themselves. This union is radical and has done many strikes in California. It would not surprise me if they went out on strike again. So sad to think of all the money the nurses are losing by going out on strike. I do not share the same views and values on nursing as this union I therefore will not support them.

      Reply

    • It is like 2010 nurses are just following MNA without educating themselves.

      Reply

  82. Posted by jojo12 on August 19, 2016 at 10:28 am

    Yes, it is happening again. So frustrating. Only the patients and other staff suffer

    Reply

    • Agreed and it will not end well. The nurses will lose more money being out on strike than they will have paid out for healthcare.

      Reply

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